One Of My Favorite Things

The story that inspired O Holy Night

Photo credit Pinterest

I love discovering the story behind songs I love.

Tor Constantino, a friend we have come to know through blogging, asked his FB friends to share their favorite Christmas Carol. I was surprised at how many chose my favorite song , O Holy Night. This led me to wonder about the history of this well-loved song. I was amazed to discover it, and even more amazed that I’ve never heard it.

I share with you the following in the hopes that it will encourage us all in the coming year to live up to the Truths of these inspired lyrics.

In 1847, Placide Cappeau de Roquemaure was the commissionaire of wines in a small French town. Known more for his poetry than his church attendance, it probably shocked Placide when his parish priest asked the commissionaire to pen a poem for Christmas mass. Nevertheless, the poet was honored to share his talents with the church.

In a dusty coach traveling down a bumpy road to France’s capital city, Placide Cappeau considered the priest’s request. Using the gospel of Luke as his guide, Cappeau imagined witnessing the birth of Jesus in Bethlehem. Thoughts of being present on the blessed night inspired him. By the time he arrived in Paris, “Cantique de Noel” had been completed.

Moved by his own work, Cappeau decided that his “Cantique de Noel” was not just a poem, but a song in need of a master musician’s hand. Not musically inclined himself, the poet turned to one of his friends, Adolphe Charles Adams, for help.

The son of a well-known classical musician, Adolphe had studied in the Paris conservatoire. His talent and fame brought requests to write works for orchestras and ballets all over the world. Yet the lyrics that his friend Cappeau gave him must have challenged the composer in a fashion unlike anything he received from London, Berlin, or St. Petersburg. 

As a man of Jewish ancestry, for Adolphe the words of “Cantique de Noel” represented a day he didn’t celebrate and a man he did not view as the son of God. Nevertheless, Adams quickly went to work, attempting to marry an original score to Cappeau’s beautiful words. Adams’ finished work pleased both poet and priest. The song was performed just three weeks later at a Midnight Mass on Christmas Eve. 

Initially, “Cantique de Noel” was wholeheartedly accepted by the church in France and the song quickly found its way into various Catholic Christmas services. But when Placide Cappeau walked away from the church and became a part of the socialist movement, and church leaders discovered that Adolphe Adams was a Jew, the song–which had quickly grown to be one of the most beloved Christmas songs in France–was suddenly and uniformly denounced by the church. The heads of the French Catholic church of the time deemed “Cantique de Noel” as unfit for church services because of its lack of musical taste and “total absence of the spirit of religion.” Yet even as the church tried to bury the Christmas song, the French people continued to sing it, and a decade later a reclusive American writer brought it to a whole new audience halfway around the world.

Not only did this American writer–John Sullivan Dwight–feel that this wonderful Christmas songs needed to be introduced to America, he saw something else in the song that moved him beyond the story of the birth of Christ. An ardent abolitionist, Dwight strongly identified with the lines of the third verse: “Truly he taught us to love one another; his law is love and his gospel is peace. Chains shall he break, for the slave is our brother; and in his name all oppression shall cease.” The text supported Dwight’s own view of slavery in the South. Published in his magazine, Dwight’s English translation of “O Holy Night” quickly found found favor in America, especially in the North during the Civil War.

Back in France, even though the song had been banned from the church for almost two decades, many commoners still sang “Cantique de Noel” at home. Legend has it that on Christmas Eve 1871, in the midst of fierce fighting between the armies of Germany and France, during the Franco-Prussian War, a French soldier suddenly jumped out of his muddy trench. Both sides stared at the seemingly crazed man. Boldly standing with no weapon in his hand or at his side, he lifted his eyes to the heavens and sang, “Minuit, Chretiens, c’est l’heure solennelle ou L’Homme Dieu descendit jusqu’a nous,” the beginning of “Cantique de Noel.

After completing all three verses, a German infantryman climbed out his hiding place and answered with, “Vom Himmel noch, da komm’ ich her. Ich bring’ euch gute neue Mar, Der guten Mar bring’ ich so viel, Davon ich sing’n und sagen will,” the beginning of Martin Luther’s robust “From Heaven Above to Earth I Come.”

Continue reading at Beliefnet

Enjoy this version by another favorite, Josh Groben.

Happy New Year!

About Debi Walter

Face it, marriage is hard work. But when cultivated daily the fruit produced will satisfy for a lifetime. We're here to help with ideas and encouragement along the way. Having been married 40 years and counting, we share what we've learned with practical tips, Biblical Truths, Date night ideas to help you plow your own vineyard for God's glory.
This entry was posted in Christian Marriage, Christmas, Holidays, Music, Worship and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to One Of My Favorite Things

  1. Awesome! (And I hope you had a wonderful Christmas!)

    The only carol whose backstory I knew was that of “I Heard The Bells On Christmas Day”, based on Longfellow’s Civil War poem ‘Christmas Bells’.

    Here’s Casting Crowns singing it.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Debi Walter says:

      We did have a Merry Christmas, Andrew. But we’re not finished yet. We head to our daughter’s this weekend for New Year’s and to give them our gifts. Give our best wishes to your wife! 🎄😊

      Like

      • Godspeed your travels, ebi! And I will pass on your felicitations to Barbara.

        She has a dear friend who is in hospital with a serious illness (and who is undergoing heart surgery today), and has spent nearly all of her free time being a pillar of support. She was there through the entire Christmas weekend, and will be there as her work permits until Caryn is released.

        It’s the right thing to do on Christmas (or at ANY time!). God came to bring comfort to a desperately ill world; should we not do likewise for our friends?

        Liked by 1 person

      • Debi Walter says:

        Absolutely. What a good friend! Blessings!

        Like

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